Teaching

The two courses that I teach most regularly are Venture Capital (BEM 110) and Empirical Methods in the Social Sciences (PhD).  

Venture capital (most recent syllabus)

Venture capital and private equity play an important role in the financing and development of high-growth entrepreneurial firms.  Many large, successful public companies once received venture capital financing or were backed by private equity firms.  This course will cover the tools and methods used by venture capitalist to evaluate, structure and value entrepreneurial firms.  Although this market is relatively small compared to the activities of investment banks or hedge funds, the skills required are unique and improve one's understanding of asset valuation.  The private equity market also presents an ideal environment to study how market structure, valuation and contracting respond to economic frictions such an information asymmetries and principal-agent issues.  The asset class includes multiple, independent and sophisticated actors whose interactions play an important role in investment behavior. Understanding these patterns is critical whether one intends to work for, receive funds from, underwrite the offerings of or invest in or alongside private equity funds.

Empirical Methods in the Social Sciences (most recent syllabus)

This is an applied econometrics course that covers the estimation techniques and econometric theory used in contemporary empirical work.  With the goal of making causal inference, we will focus on the application of the tools in corporate finance and accounting.  The methods covered are applicable to all fields that use non-experimental data, while the emphasis will be on the application of tools rather than the statistical theory.   The course has three goals.  Students will (i) learn the why and how of major econometric techniques, (ii) effectively structure empirical analysis of research questions, and (iii) strengthen their ability to dissect, digest and critique academic research through referee reports.  The topics include the standard empirical identification problem, instrumental variables, difference-in-difference methods, natural experiments, event study and panel data methods.

Teaching experience

2021
  • Venture Capital [Undergraduate BEM, Winter]
  • Corporate Finance [Undergraduate BEM, Spring]

2017-2020
  • Venture Capital [Undergraduate BEM, Winter]
  • Empirical Methods in the Social Sciences [PhD, Winter]
  • Introduction to Accounting [Undergraduate BEM, Spring]

2016
  • Venture Capital [Undergraduate BEM, Winter]
  • Empirical Methods in the Social Sciences [PhD, Winter]
2015
  • Empirical Methods in the Social Sciences [PhD, Winter]
  • Venture Capital [Undergraduate BEM, Winter]
  • New Venture Finance [UCSD Rady, Spring 2015]


Previous Teaching at Carnegie Mellon University (Tepper School of Business)

2014
  • Empirical Methods in Corporate Finance and Accounting [Mini 2, PhD Course]
  • Private Equity Finance [MBA, Mini 3]
  • Venture Capital Finance [MBA, Mini 4]
  • Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance [Undergrad, Mini 3]
  • Entrepreneurial Finance: Valuation and Deal Structure [Undergrad, Mini 4
2013
  • Empirical Methods in Corporate Finance and Accounting [Mini 3, PhD Course]
  • Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance [Undergrad, Mini 3]
  • Venture Capital and Private Equity [MBA, Mini 4]
  • Entrepreneurial Finance: Valuation and Deal Structure [Undergrad, Mini 4]
2012
  • Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance [undergraduate, Mini-3]
  • Venture Capital and Private Equity [MBA, Mini 4]
  • Venture Capital and Private Equity [MBA, Mini 2, 2013]
2011
  • Venture Capital Investing [undergraduate, 70-397]
  • Venture Capital and Private Equity [MBA, 45-907 A,E]